Garbage In, Garbage Out

Early in my childhood I became a fan of the Christian band “Petra”. I made friends from church camp and youth retreats who shared their music with me. I especially connected with the song “Computer Brains” (link below if you’re so inclined). This thought is similar to what Brian posts, follow along and be prepared for some sobering thoughts to consider.

Thoughts lead to beliefs, beliefs lead to…

Brian Roemmele’s Twitter

Petra - Computer Brains

Does the news reflect what we die from?

Fascinating post from Bill Gates’ Twitter. Oddly enough after a couple of decades of being on the Apple side of the Mac vs. PC war I find admiration for the Gates’ family growing and growing with each passing year. If only we had more families like theirs!

From the Our World in Data article, “The major standout here – I had to break the scale on the y-axis since it's several orders of magnitude higher than everything else – is terrorism: it is overrepresented in the news by almost a factor of 4000.” Fascinating to see these stats.

Bill Gates Twitter

Brad Voytek from UCSD shared his team’s original research

Charting Death - source writing

A taste of life with Google

Spending most of your life outside of Google’s reach tends to lessen ones perception of the horror that is being a product, rather than a consumer. The “Apple way” attracts me not only because they sell high quality products but also because they are crystal clear that they’re selling me a product, and I am the consumer.

Google intrigues me for many reasons, chief among them is their ability to convince millions of people that they should enjoy free services while blindly ignoring what happens with their information or why they would be allowed to use all of these products for free. Deep in my soul is a nostalgic longing for “Alta Vista” or maybe even “Dog Pile” on a crazy day.

Back in 2005-2006 personal email was quite the challenge for many. Google’s search engine had already become the defacto synonym for the phrase “internet search” but email remained a challenge. Friends would change their email address on a regular basis as they switched ISP’s and existing solutions like Yahoo and Hotmail were subpar at best. Storage became a problem as was the ability to scale and provide these services at levels of exponential growth. Queue Google….all hail Gmail. Gmail came with the promise of large amounts of storage and free email. As a 1990’s part-time PC user who rode the Netscape train all the way to H-E double hockey sticks and refused to use IE I knew what was going to happen next.

Speeding up the story…I couldn’t sign up for MobileMe fast enough and even tolerated it’s failures (my personal email still ends in @me.com). iCloud has grown to do a wonderful job for me but internet search is the wildcard, pun intended, with Duck Duck Go as my default for several years. It’s not Google, but it does the job.

A recent curioristy-induced purchase of a cheap Chromebook brought me to terms with he current reality of consuming Google’s services. I dove head first into the Chromebook and all associated services. The Dell hardware was underpowered but not horrible, especially considering the price point.

Rather than bore you with an in-depth analysis of Google’s services and what it’s like to use them I found it more humorous to share three screenshots of my first attempted creation of a new email message, my first attempt to watch a youtube video, and the resulting first seconds of viewing a youtube video. How do people deal with this?

Teaching Twitter to play nice

Nice read. I’ve long pondered the aging nature of Twitter and it’s continual lack of new feature innovation. The challenges with threads are one example. I opened my first twitter account in May 2008 with such joy and excitement for the platform. Looking back I can see the damage it has done.

While it’s good to see them consider options I wonder how close they’ll come to addressing the true “incentives” of the platform which encourage much of the bad behavior.

Buzzfeed article

Facebook's Wonderful Week of Fun - March 22

Continuing the saga of all that is Facebook. All kidding aside, I read this stuff and think “surely this can’t keep happening”, “surely it won't get any worse”. Hard to believe I’m still this naive.

In this week’s issue - it was revealed that Facebook stored user’s passwords in plain text for many years. Spoiler alert, this isn’t a good thing. Essentially this means that Facebook employees could know and use your own login credentials to login to your account.

In typical Facebook fashion they have admitted the issue but are stating it’s a limited set of users. This will inevitably be revised to some higher number on page 6 of a small town newspaper later this year when nobody is looking.

Krebs on Security

Facebook's Wonderful Week of Fun - March 15

Each week when I make decisions about where to spend my time and what to post I become increasingly aware of the state of all things “facebook”. Maybe a weekly summary is good enough for now!

Here’s the highlights:

Facebook survived issues like this a decade ago when it was run by a group of fast moving people early in their career. We accepted those mistakes with an “awwww shucks” type of attitude. Those days are over. Facebook is a global technology powerhouse with the influence to change the course of human history.

Two words for you - wake up

Imagine Dragons and the curse of Nickelback

What a burden and genuine care that Dan displays. His passion for others and transparency about his own challenges do inspire me. I’m openly a fan of Imagine Dragons and vividly remember the first time I heard “Radioactive” performed at a friend’s church in Denver followed by hearing "On Top of the World” in a movie that same day. Amazing work from a real human being.

RE: Slipknot’s Corey Taylor’s comments, still wondering why we seem so bent on dividing and using social media to divide….

Stereogum Article